Publications Incorporating U. S. Government Works

March 19, 2010 | FAQs

Works by the U. S. Government are not eligible for U. S. copyright protection. For works published on and after March 1, 1989, the previous notice requirement for works consisting primarily of one or more U. S. Government works has been eliminated. However, use of a notice on such a work will defeat a claim […]

Form of Notice for Visually Perceptible Copies

March 19, 2010 | FAQs

The notice for visually perceptible copies should contain all the following three elements: 1. The symbol © (the letter C in a circle), or the word “Copyright,” or the abbreviation “Copr.”; and 2. The year of first publication of the work. In the case of compilations or derivative works incorporating previously published material, the year […]

Notice Of Copyright

March 19, 2010 | FAQs

The use of a copyright notice is no longer required under U. S. law, although it is often beneficial. Because prior law did contain such a requirement, however, the use of notice is still relevant to the copyright status of older works. Notice was required under the 1976 Copyright Act. This requirement was eliminated when […]

How To Secure A Copyright

March 19, 2010 | FAQs

The way in which copyright protection is secured is frequently misunderstood. No publication or registration or other action in the Copyright Office is required to secure copyright. There are, however, certain definite advantages to registration. Copyright is secured automatically when the work is created, and a work is “created” when it is fixed in a […]

What Is Not Protected By Copyright

March 19, 2010 | FAQs

Several categories of material are generally not eligible for federal copyright protection. These include among others: Works that have not been fixed in a tangible form of expression (for example, choreographic works that have not been notated or recorded, or improvisational speeches or performances that have not been written or recorded) Titles, names, short phrases, […]

What Works Are Protected

March 19, 2010 | FAQs

Copyright protects “original works of authorship” that are fixed in a tangible form of expression. The fixation need not be directly perceptible so long as it may be communicated with the aid of a machine or device. Copyrightable works include the following categories: (1) literary works; (2) musical works, including any accompanying words (3) dramatic […]

Who Can Claim Copyright

March 19, 2010 | FAQs

Copyright protection subsists from the time the work is created in fixed form. The copyright in the work of authorship immediately becomes the property of the author who created the work. Only the author or those deriving their rights through the author can rightfully claim copyright. In the case of works made for hire, the […]

What Is Copyright

March 19, 2010 | FAQs

Copyright is a form of protection provided under federal law to the authors of “original works of authorship,” including literary, dramatic, musical, artistic, and certain other intellectual works. This protection is available to both published and unpublished works. Section 106 of the 1976 Copyright Act generally gives the owner of copyright the exclusive right to […]

Foreign Applicants for U.S. Patents

March 19, 2010 | FAQs

The patent laws of the United States make no discrimination with respect to the citizenship of the inventor. Any inventor, regardless of his/her citizenship, may apply for a patent on the same basis as a U.S. citizen. There are, however, a number of particular points of special interest to applicants located in foreign countries. The […]

Treaties and Foreign Patents

March 19, 2010 | FAQs

Since the rights granted by a U.S. patent extend only throughout the territory of the United States and have no effect in a foreign country, an inventor who wishes patent protection in other countries must apply for a patent in each of the other countries or in regional patent offices. Almost every country has its […]